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Llisa Demetrios, chief curator of the Eames Institute and granddaughter of Charles Eames in the gallery giving a tour.

Explore an Unrivaled Collection of Everything Eames

Ray and Charles Eames’s boundless curiosity and passion for problem-solving drove a practice that spanned furniture, architecture, film, exhibition design, and more. Located in Richmond, California, the Eames Archives holds one of the world’s most significant Eames collections—40,000+ objects, including industrial designs, prototypes, ephemera, tools, and personal items the pioneering design duo created and collected.

This wealth of material, which comes largely from the Eameses themselves and their office in Venice, California, offers visitors an in-depth understanding of the prolific couple’s lives, creative process, and influential design philosophy. As our staff catalogs these extensive holdings, the Archives will continue to shed new light on this great cultural legacy.

Tours

Tours of the Eames Archives are held Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays and are limited to groups of 10. They run for approximately 90 minutes and must be booked in advance.

Llisa Demetrios, chief curator of the Eames Institute sitting among the Eameses' many designs.

Meet Your Host

Llisa Demetrios, chief curator of the Eames Institute and granddaughter of Ray and Charles, will give you intimate access to the collection—showing not only iconic designs you know, but also rarely seen artifacts that fed the Eameses’ curiosity and design process.

Schedule

Day of week
Time of day
Wednesdays
Thursdays
Fridays

Tickets are released at 10:00 am Pacific time on the first of the month for the following month's tours.

Doors open 15 minutes before the start time and tours begin promptly as scheduled. Late arrivals cannot be accommodated.

Pricing

Ticket type
Cost
General Admission $85
Seniors (65+) $75
Students (with ID) $45

We are unable to accommodate infants and children under 12.

Children over 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

Private Tours and Large Groups

We are not offering private tours or group visits of more than 10 people at this time. If you would like to be notified when private tours and large group bookings become available, please let us know here.

Archives Study Center

Researchers at an educational institution, museum, or affiliated nonprofit can email research@eamesinstitute.org to inquire about arranging a visit.

Cancellations and Refunds

Change of plans? To cancel or reschedule your reservation, contact us at visit@eamesinstitute.org. Reservations cancelled at least 24 hours in advance of a scheduled tour will be fully refunded.

Tour Highlights

What will you discover on the tour? Decades of design innovation and unique objects that provide fresh insight into the Eameses’ life and work.

Several guests being led on a tour of the gallery by Llisa Demetrios, chief curator of the Eames Institute.

The Gallery

Delve into an exhibition illuminating the history of the Eameses’ creative practice and partnership and the principles that guided their process.

Furniture and prototypes designed by Ray and Charles Eames fill the aisles at the Eames Institute in Richmond California.

Collections Center

Walk the aisles of our expansive display of furniture, prototypes, and ephemera to see firsthand how the Eameses developed their groundbreaking designs.

Eames Institute exhibition catalogs sit beside several books on display at the shop in Richmond California.

The Shop

Browse a selection of books, vintage items, and design objects inspired by the Archives’ one-of-a-kind collection.

Directions

Our location is easily accessible by car or public transit. Visitor parking is available in the front entrance lot or on the street. Please note that a tour reservation is required for entry.

Our Address

Eames Institute
1330 South 51st Street
Richmond, CA 94804

Get Directions

Public Transit

Take BART to El Cerrito del Norte, Amtrak to Richmond, or the San Francisco Bay Ferry to Richmond or Larkspur. A quick drive via your favorite ride-hailing service can bring you to our location.

Take Transit

The modern exterior of the Eames Institute in Richmond California houses the Eames collection and archives.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I buy a ticket at the door?

Tickets must be purchased in advance. We keep our tour groups small (with a 10-person maximum) to ensure the best experience for each guest. Walk-ins cannot be accommodated.

Can I schedule a private tour?

During our initial launch period, we are prioritizing public access to the archives through our online booking system. If you’d like to be notified when private tours become available, please let us know here.

Can I schedule a tour for a large group?

Our current Eames Archives tour experience has been designed for small groups and is not able to accommodate groups of more than 10 people. If you’d like to be notified when large group bookings become available, please let us know here.

Is there a coat room?

​​Yes. Coats must be worn or checked, and all bags, purses, laptops, packages, and umbrellas must be checked. Luggage and large objects are not permitted in the Archives. We recommend leaving valuables at home.

What items are not allowed inside?

To help protect our collection and ensure a safe environment for all, please do not bring the following into the Archives: food or beverages, cigarettes or vapes, art supplies, large bags, weapons, or camera equipment (such as tripods and selfie sticks).

Where can I grab a bite to eat nearby?

There are many great cafés, restaurants, and wine bars in the area. Click here for a map of our recommendations.

Is photography allowed?

You can take pictures in the Archives but not videos. Please refrain from photographing other guests or staff without their consent. Flashes, tripods, and selfie sticks are not permitted.

Can I bring my kids?

Due to the fragile nature of the objects on view, infants and children under 12 are not permitted. Children over 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

How about pets?

Leave pets and support animals at home. ADA-recognized service dogs are welcome throughout the Archives.

What is your visitor policy?

Be considerate of those around you. This means:

  • Stay home if you feel under the weather. To cancel or reschedule your tour, email visit@eamesinstitute.org. Reservations canceled at least 24 hours in advance will be fully refunded.
  • Leave food and drink and other prohibited items at home or in your car.
  • Arrive on time for your tour. Doors open 15 minutes before scheduled tour times.
  • Refrain from behavior that would disrupt the tour or inhibit our staff from carrying out their jobs.
  • Do not smoke or vape on the premises. Our campus is smoke-free.
  • Treat your fellow tour members and Archives staff with respect.

Are the Archives accessible?

The galleries and grounds, including the parking lots, are accessible to visitors using wheeled and seated mobility devices. Two wheelchair-accessible restrooms are available in the galleries. Personal care attendants accompanying ticket holders receive complimentary admission. Service animals are welcome throughout the Archives. For more information, contact us at visit@eamesinstitute.org.

What other things can I do in the area?

Make a day of your visit. Nearby attractions include:

Where can I stay overnight?

Hotels in the area include:

Can I visit the Eames Ranch?

A working farm, the Eames Ranch is undergoing a multiyear renovation to host educational tours and agricultural workshops.

Stay Curious

Explore our online exhibitions and digital magazine, Kazam!, where we share stories about the people, projects, and ideas shaping a better tomorrow.

Close up of Llisa Demetrios, Chief Curator at the Eames Institute, as a young girl, Kazam Magazine.
Visit “Llisa Draws a Letter”
ToysPlay_Img_01Homepage_still
Visit “Toys & Play”
Chef, fermenter, food scientist, and recipe developer, David Zilber outside his lab in Hørsholm, Denmark.
Visit “Design Q&A: David Zilber”
Several Eames tables made of various materials displayed on colorful pedestals.
Visit “Tables! Tables! Tables!”